John D. Lee

Professor, The University of Wisconsin, Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering
Director of the Cognitive Systems Laboratory
jdlee@engr.wisc.edu

Education
PhD, Mechanical Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, 1992
MS, Industrial Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, 1989
BS, Mechanical Engineering (with Honors), Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, 1988
BA, Psychology (with Honors), Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, 1987
University of York, England, 1985-1986

Special Fields of Knowledge
Human Factors, Cognitive Engineering, Modeling Human Behavior

Research Interests
Technology Mediated Attention, Trust in Technology, Supervisory Control, Collision Warning Systems and Driver Distraction

Select Publications
Lee, J. D. (2009). Can technology get your eyes back on the road? Science, 324, 344-346.

Lee, J. D. (2008). Fifty years of driving safety research. Human Factors, 50(3), 521-528.

Lee, J. D., and See, K. A. (2004). Trust in technology: Designing for appropriate reliance. Human Factors, 46(1), 50-80.

Lee, J. D., Vicente, K. J., Cassano, A., and Shearer, A. (2003). Can scientific impact be judged prospectively? A bibliometric test of Simonton's model of creative productivity. Scientometrics, 56(2), 223-233.

Lee, J. D., McGehee, D. V., Brown, T. L., and Reyes, M. L. (2002). Collision warning timing, driver distraction, and driver response to imminent rear-end collisions in a high-fidelity driving simulator. Human Factors, 44(2), 314-334.

Hoffman, J. D., Brown, T. L., Lee, J. D., and McGehee, D. V. (2002). Comparisons of braking in a high fidelity simulator to braking on a test track. Transportation Research Record, 1803, 59-65.

McGehee, D. V., Lee, J. D., Rizzo, M., Dawson, J., and Bateman, K. (2004). Quantitative analysis of steering adaptation on a high performance driving simulator. Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behavior, 7(181-196).

Wiese, E. E., and Lee, J. D. (2004). Effects of multiple auditory alerts for in-vehicle information systems on driver attitudes and performance. Ergonomics, 9, 965-986.

Cross References
ISyE faculty page
UW Cognitive Systems Laboratory